ARTIST IN-
RESIDENCE

My Granddad’s Car

Sayed Sattar Hasan
Artist in Residence


Sayed Sattar Hasan spent two months at the NCA as an artist in residence to further explore his practice and tutor students on the MA (Hons.) Visual Art Program. In the last week of his residency he used the NCA gallery space to display and develop his project My Granddad’s Car.

Three years ago Hasan came to Pakistan in an attempt to send his grandfather’s car to the UK. Unfortunately, legal obstacles stood in his way. The inefficiency of the courts and Hasan’s reliance on others to deal with matters in his absence hampered his plan. Now re-imagined as a sculptural form the car has taken on a new physical identity – that of an artwork. This shift in object classification opens up the possibility of bypassing the bureaucracy of small claims courts and export laws, offering new hope in shipping the car to England.

Regardless of where the car ends up, it’s reinvention as a symbolic object enables Hasan to continue exploring the cycle of history –which is provable yet hard to substantiate, real and mythological – while negotiating the present.

Raised in the UK by a British mother and Pakistani father, Hasan’s multiple identities have complicated the notion of home and belonging. As an artist he identifies a two fold dilemma which he tries to reconcile through his work. Firstly, the potential of losing one’s connection to family and heritage due to the innumerable consequences of migration, and secondly the need to embrace contemporary life which is often at odds with the past and tradition.

Hasan adopts a process driven methodology within his visual arts practice, which reflects his outlook that everyday life is in a continual state of flux. Many people from within and outside the college had an opportunity to see the work throughout the duration of the show, and see how Hasan’s thought process manifested itself in his work. The project provoked in- depth discussion around the NCA, which we hope to continue with Hasan in the future.



“Other-worldly Narratives”

Hyun Ju Kim
Artist in Residence at NCA


On 7th May, an exhibition of etchings and lithographs of South Korean artist in residence Hyun Ju Kim was inaugurated at The Zahoor ul Akhlaq Gallery. Principal of the NCA, Dr. Murtaza Jafri was the guest of honour and inaugurated the exhibition.

Hyun Ju Kim's exhibition at The Zahoor ul Akhlaq Gallery comprised of printed works in lithography produced at The NCA Cowasjee Printmaking Studio as well as a selection of her other prints that consisted of etchings and aquatints.

NCA is one of the few institutions that offers the facility of practicing the lithography technique. Kim explained that it was the presence of the equipment and the Printing Press that is necessary specifically for the production of lithograph prints that drew her to NCA.

Lithography is a method of printing that involves the use of limestone blocks, chemicals and water. After drawing on the stone with a wax crayon, the image is etched using chemicals and relies on the immiscibility of water and oil for its results. A printing press, specific to the needs of the technique is also necessary.

The prints were varied in size. Most were monochromatic while the most recent, done using the physically strenuous technique of rubbing two limestone blocks against each other, were done at NCA. These were partially rendered in colour.Kim has an Undergraduate Degree from Dankook University, South Korea and received her Masters in Fine Art at Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan, India.

Since graduating in 2009, Hyun Ju Kim has exhibited in London, Greece, Cairo, Bhopal, Australia and Hong Kong and undertaken residencies in countries including Egypt, Greece, India, Australia, New Zealand and China. Hyun Ju Kim has taught at Lalit Kala Academy, Bhubaneswar, India and taken part in a Serigraphy Workshop at the Government College of Art and Craft, Kolkota.

The images were meticulously executed and immensely detailed. Fantastical beasts, spirits, animals and birds; some set against gently toned, velvety backgrounds animated the walls of the Gallery. Some floated, others conversed and contemplated in the lush vegetation of forests and jungles or danced across moonlit nights amidst the ruins of forts. A celebration of nature and the power of human imagination; these whimsical compositions, laden with anthrpomorphic figures, became vehicles for telling deeply personal narratives that spoke of rebirth and coexistence.

One could identify stylistic references drawn from a plethora of sources such as the tradition of miniature painting of the subcontinent, architectural elements that were drawn from Buddhist architecture and Mughal forts while popular Japanese culture namely anime was referenced as well.

Amorphous spirits could be seen playing hide and seek amongst seemingly quotidian scenes set in twilight or semidarkness.The presence of these spirits in some works, referenced characteristics of Shintoism, a religion which venerates dead ancestors' spirits and involves nature worship. Explaining how her work is meant to engage the viewer Kim said, "I'm just helping them to dream. Imagine through my work... what are you really thinking?" Kim's consummate skill and effort was greatly appreciated by The Head of Fine Arts Department at the NCA, Mr. Quddus Mirza. Hyun Ju Kim conducted the printmaking elective at the NCA during her stay. She also held a special workshop on lithography for the MA (Hons.) Visual Arts students.



Energy of Holy Colours

Amina Ansari
Artist in Residence


On 16th June 2015, Zahoor ul Akhlaq Gallery showcased the work of artist in residence, Amina Ansari titled “Energy of Holy Colours”. Amina Ansari is an upcoming British Asian artist from London. While she has an avid interest in the human figure, her colour pallette and its vibrancy is intrinsically South Asian.

Amina Ansari has had the honour of having her paintings bieng recently shown in the prestigious Houses of Parliament London; her work is also curently part of Her Majesty’s Windsor Castle collection.

In her two month stint at NCA, Amina Ansari has retained her interest in the human figure but has sought inspiration from the rainbow and its many hues. Equating a vivid spectrum of colour to people and experiences, Amina Ansari's work was like an emotional personal narrative that celebrated life as an explosion of colour and mark making.

Tactile in quality, as well as gestural, her vigorous brushstrokes were contrasted with an almost naturalistic approach to the expressive portraits in her large scale mural. Her interest in design and pattern was more evident in the work displayed in the center of the Zahoor ul Akhlaq Gallery. Freestanding mannequins posed on a bed of textured golden collage which blazed under the gallery lights; the mannequins were awash in a myriad of colours, decorative marks and symbols that enabled the viewer to interact and move around the work.

The exhibition was attended and appreciated by teachers and students alike.

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